Carbon Monoxide Information



Carbon Monoxide Information 


Link To

Carbon Monoxide Monitor Comparison

 
UL Listed Alarms
Other
Low Level Monitors
NSI 3000 
Low Level Monitor
Professional grade sensor
 
X*
X
1st visual readout at 5 ppm within 30 seconds  X
Low audible alarm level at 15 ppm after 5 minutes  X
High level audible alarm at 35 ppm after 5 minutes  X
Crisis audible alarm level at 70 ppm after 30 secondsX**XX
Manual silence button at low levels XX
Cannot be silenced at crisis levels  X
Protection for all ages XX
Digital memory with recallX*XX
Continuous on-screen display  X
Digital CO readoutX*XX
CO display range from 5-999 ppm  X
Battery operatedX*XX
Can be installed at eye levelX*XX
Can be converted to tabletop use  X
Sensor can be checked with match smoke XX
User response instructions printed on unit  X
Minimum 3-year warrantyX* X
Maximum protection for all age groups  X
Notes: ppm = parts per million ** - Allowed to take up to 240 minutes to alarm * - Available only on a few model
 

Why You Need a Carbon Monoxide Test

Carbon Monoxide is the #1 cause of poisonings in the U.S. Yet less than 5% of all CO Poisonings are reported! The safe and efficient operation of your heating equipment and other combustion appliances cannot be determined without testing using a calibrated combustion analyzer. Because the technology, instruments and training to do this testing correctly has only been available for a few years, odds are it's never been done. Your service technician should be certified to properly test and diagnose potential CO exposure.

It's About Your Health and Safety

Carbon monoxide, even in small quantities can cause serious health problems, particularly in children and the elderly. Millions of unsuspecting homeowners are exposed to low levels of CO and don't even know it. Unfortunately U.L. Listed CO alarms don't go off until your family has been exposed to 70ppm (parts per million) for over 3-1/2 hours! Most international limits for unsafe levels, including OSHA and the World Health Organization's guidelines are between at 15-35 ppm. Carbon monoxide can come from additional sources in your home besides your heating equipment, and they should be checked. These sources include your Water Heater, Gas Range, Gas Logs, Space Heater, and Boiler - even an attached garage.

Even New Equipment Needs to be Tested

Anytime equipment is installed, it's being exposed to conditions in which it has never been tested to perform. Venting systems, combustion air, duct systems, additional appliances in the building, building pressure etc., can all affect its operation. Besides that, after leaving the factory it's likely your equipment has been loaded and unloaded on trucks and transported several times. Vibration and shock can cause components to shift and move. The only way to truly know if your new equipment is operating safely and efficiently is to test it once it's been installed.

Better Contractors Don't Guess

They measure. If CO testing is part of your contractor's normal protocols he will advise you of this prior to servicing or installing equipment. Odds are when the tech walks into you house he'll be carrying some type of CO Monitor to immediately check if unsafe CO
levels are present. When working on the equipment, he will likely drill a hole in the flue of the appliance, and insert the probe of an electronic combustion analyzer to check actual burner performance. Additional performance testing might require holes to be drilled into the ductwork as well. Once he's finished testing he should provide documentation and review his results with you.

What Should I Expect from my Heating Contractor?

As a consumer you should expect your contractor to be trained in current technology that makes sure you're heating system is safe, comfortable and efficient. These are probably things you may expect are mandatory, but unfortunately they're not. The number one benefit of having an NCI Certified CO/Combustion Analyst test your home and appliances for carbon monoxide is his extensive training and knowledge.
Your contractor should be trained to measure the safety and efficiency of all your combustion equipment, even appliances that he doesn't normally sell or service. Thorough testing can also verify that your equipment is operating at peak efficiency and provide the lowest operating costs. Finally, he should provide you with documentation that explains what he has found and what corrections have been or need to be performed. He should also provide you with material to better educate you about carbon monoxide sources and health effects.


Low-Level Carbon Monoxide Monitor National Safety Institute Model 3000



Protect Your Entire Family With NSI's Professional Grade Low-Level Carbon Monoxide Monitor. 

Provides protection for all age groups and conditions, especially infants, children, the elderly, and highly sensitive or ill people. Other detectors barely provide minimal protection for healthy adults. 

Lets you know there's a problem before reaching dangerous, even deadly CO levels, long before the other detectors even begin to work. 

NSI's Model 3000 Monitors employ the same electrochemical sensor technology found in professional CO Analyzers that cost thousands of dollars. These monitors are calibrated using CO, not electronic guesswork! 

Ask your NCI-Certified Contractor how an NSI 3000 Monitor can help keep your home safe and healthy today!
 
The NSI 3000 Offers Real Protection
  • Continuous Scan mode lets you know monitor for CO 24/7
  • Digital display shows CO levels of 5ppm or higher
  • Low Alarm - 15 ppm - audible & visual every 8 seconds
  • High Alarm - 35 ppm - audible & visual every 4 seconds
  • Crisis Alarm - 70+ ppm - audible & visual every 2 seconds
  • 5-minute "Hush" button for levels below 70 ppm
  • Replaceable 9V battery ensures operation even when power is out
  • Designed for wall installation or tabletop use
  • 3-Year limited Warrant
 
Facts You Should Know to Protect Your Family
 
Why do I need a low-level monitor? 
The NSI low level monitor senses CO levels as low as 5 ppm (parts per million). Infants, children, elderly, persons with respiratory or heart ailments are provided little or no protection from deadly CO with standard alarms. Longterm exposure to Low-level CO above 15 ppm can cause illness and even permanent disabilities.
 
What about the other "detectors" sold at retailers and home centers? 
Store-bought detectors don't alarm until unsafe levels of 70 ppm or higher are present at the unit for 3-1/2 hours! By then it may be too late. Plug-in models don't always allow for proper placement and don't work during power outages. The NSI 3000 is battery powered for 24/7 protection. 

Why is the NSI 3000 more expensive than the others? 
Accurate, low-level CO detection requires more expensive components & quality control. The NSI 3000 CO monitor uses the same technology and sensors as in professional-grade CO analyzers used by contractors, fire departments, and utilities.And NSI's unique Continuous Scan mode lets you know the monitor is operational 24/7!
 
How many monitors should I have in my home? 
As with smoke detectors, you should have one monitor installed on every level of your home. Even a single story home may need two; one at each end. 

Where should I place the NSI monitor? 
CO is lighter than air. Monitors should be mounted at eye level and no lower. They should be placed in an area with good air circulation. If you have only one monitor it should be placed near the master bedroom. Additional locations include your kitchen, nursery, basement, rooms with fireplaces or gas logs, and near your heating system and/or hot water tank.Your professional installation contractor will determine the best location in your home. 

What should I do if my monitor goes off? 
Call your CO-Certified contractor at any level below 70 ppm, unless you have symptoms. CO exposure can cause nausea, severe headache, shortness of breath, chest pain, blurred vision, and dizziness. If you experience these symptoms call 911 and leave the house immediately. Above 70ppm, evacuate immediately. If you have symptoms, call 911 from a neighbors house. Call your utility to turn off the equipment until your CO Certified contractor can investigate the source of carbon monoxide.
 

Protect Your Entire Family with NSI's Professional Grade Low-Level Carbon Monoxide Monitor.

Provides protection for all age groups and conditions, especially infants, children, the elderly, and highly sensitive or ill people. Other detectors barely provide minimal protection for healthy adults.
Lets you know there’s a problem before reaching dangerous, even deadly CO levels, long before the other detectors even begin to work.
NSI’s Model 3000 Monitors employ the same electrochemical sensor technology found in professional CO Analyzers that cost thousands of dollars. These monitors are calibrated using CO, not electronic guesswork!
Ask your NCI-Certified Contractor how an NSI 3000 Monitor can help keep your home safe and healthy today!
Facts You Should Know to Protect Your Family
 Why do I need a low-level monitor?
 The NSI low level monitor senses CO levels as low as 5 ppm (parts per million). Infants, children, elderly, persons with respiratory or heart ailments are provided little or no protection from deadly CO with standard alarms. Long term exposure to Low-level CO above 15 ppm can cause illness and even permanent disabilities.
What about the other “detectors” sold at retailers and home centers?
Store-bought detectors don’t alarm until unsafe levels of 70 ppm or higher are present at the unit for 3-1/2 hours! By then it may be too late. Plug-in models don’t always allow for proper placement and don’t work during power outages. The NSI 3000 is battery powered for 24/7 protection.
Why is the NSI 3000 more expensive than the others?
Accurate, low-level CO detection requires more expensive components & quality control. The NSI 3000 CO monitor uses the same technology and sensors as in professional-grade CO analyzers used by contractors, fire departments, and utilities.And NSI’s unique Continuous Scan™ mode lets you know the monitor is operational 24/7!
How many monitors should I have in my home?
As with smoke detectors, you should have one monitor installed on every level of your home. Even a single story home may need two, one at each end.
Where should I place the NSI monitor?
CO is lighter than air. Monitors should be mounted at eye level and no lower. They should be placed in an area with good air circulation. If you have only one monitor it should be placed near the master bedroom. Additional locations include your kitchen, nursery, basement, rooms with fireplaces or gas logs, and near your heating system and/or hot water tank.Your professional installation contractor will determine the best location in your home.

What should I do if my monitor goes off?

Call your CO-Certified contractor at any level below 70 ppm, unless you have symptoms. CO exposure can cause nausea, severe headache, shortness of breath, chest pain, blurred vision, and dizziness. If you experience these symptoms call 911 and leave the house immediately. Above 70ppm, evacuate immediately. If you have symptoms, call 911 from a neighbors house. Call your utility to turn off the equipment until your COCertified contractor can investigate the source of carbon monoxide.
The NSI 3000 Offers Real Protection:
  • Continuous Scan™ mode lets you know monitor is checking for CO – 24/7
  • Digital display shows CO levels of 5ppm or higher
  • Low Alarm - 15 ppm - audible & visual every 8 seconds
  • High Alarm - 35 ppm - audible & visual every 4 seconds
  • Crisis Alarm - 70+ ppm - audible & visual every 2 seconds
  • 5-minute “Hush” button for levels below 70 ppm
  • Designed for wall installation or tabletop use
  • Replaceable 9V battery enures operation even when power is out
  • 2-Year limited Warranty
Call us to Order the NSI 3000:  

Choosing the Right Contractor for Carbon Monoxide Testing

If you have a furnace, hot water tank, gas oven or other fuel burning appliances then it should be important to you to have a contractor that understands exactly how these combustion devices operate. You and your family's safety are at risk if these items are not installed correctly or adjusted occasionally to provide maximum efficiency and minimu Testing appliances for Carbon Monoxide safety and combustion analysis tuning is something most heating and plumbing contractors may have not been properly trained at. The probability is that most contractors will install a new furnace or hot water heater and rarely do any combustion safety and efficiency analysis. Most rely on factory settings that rarely provide maximum efficiency and definitely do not guarantee safety.
Carbon Monoxide testing is a vital process that should be performed on every fuel burning appliance in your home, yet very few HVAC contractors have the knowledge to do these tests properly. Sadly it is not a requirement of the industry or even building codes to mandate this testing. 
Therefore, one way to ensure you will get the most skilled technician that understands the risks of Carbon Monoxide and maximum appliance efficiency, is to ask if they are a "Certified - CO/Combustion Analyst" by the National Comfort Institute. National Comfort Institute "Certified" CO/Combustion contractors have received the highest level of training on the hazards of carbon monoxide and how to test for them and the means to prevent them in the future.
Each NCI contractor has complete training on proper procedures for venting, combustion air and fuel adjustment to maximize the efficiency of your fuel burning appliances to verify everything works safely together. This also means the life of your equipment should be extended because of less wear and tear.
National Comfort Institute has taken over 30 years of testing in the field experience and developed proper protocols for evaluating total equipment operation. Then through comprehensive training, NCI contractors receive the knowledge and skills to detect problems and make the necessary adjustments and repairs.
All NCI "Certified - CO/Combustion Analyst" must pass a written exam after completing training; Technicians are awarded a two-year Certification that identifies them as someone possessing the most advanced knowledge to service your equipment.
As a consumer, hiring an NCI "Certified" contractor should provide you with added confidence you have secured the services of the most skilled technician in the HVAC industry.



Carbon Monoxide Levels & Risks

CO LevelActionCO LevelAction
1-4ppmNormal levels in human tissues produced by body50ppmUS OSHA recommended 8 hour maximum workplace exposure Maximum NCI level for Unvented appliances
3-7ppm14% increase in the rate of admission in hospitals of non-elderly for asthma. (Sheppard-1999)70ppm1st Alarm level of UL2034 approved CO Alarms- 2-4 hours 3rd Alarm level for NSI 3000 - 30 seconds NSI 3000 Low Level Monitor cannot be silenced by reset button
5-6ppmSignificant risk of low birth rate if exposed during last trimester (Ritz & Yu-1999)100ppmMaximum NCI CO level during run cycle in all vented appliances(stable) Maximum NCI CO for all oil appliances
5ppm1st visual display on NSI 3000 Low Level CO Monitor200ppmFirst listed level(established in 1930) healthy adults will have symptoms-headaches, nausea NIOSH & OSHA recommend evacuation of workplace Maximum “Air Free” CO for vented water heater and unvented heaters (ANSI Z21) UL approved alarms must sound between 30 – 60 minutes (NSI 3000 – 30 seconds)
9ppmASHRAE standard for allowable spillage from vented appliances, indoors, for 8 hours exposure daily. EPA standard for outdoors for 8 hours and a maximum 3 times per year. (Clean Air Act)400ppmHealthy adults will have headaches within 1-2 hours. Life threatening after 3 hours Maximum “Air Free” CO in all vented heating appliances (ANSI Z21) Maximum EPA levels for industrial flue exhaust UL Alarms must alarm within 15 minutes (NSI 3000 – 30 seconds) Maximum recommended light-off CO for all appliances – NCI (except oil)
10ppmOutdoor level of CO found associated with a significant increase in heart disease deaths and hospital admissions for congestive heart failure. (JAMA, Penny) lst ambient level occupants should be notified-NCI Protocol800ppmHealthy adults will have nausea, dizziness, convulsions within 45 minutes. Unconscious within 2 hours then Death (established in 1930) Maximum “Air Free” CO for unvented gas ovens (ANSI Z21) 800ppm+ Death in less than one hour
15-20ppmFirst level World Health Organization lists as causing impaired performance, decrease in exercise time and vigilance 1st Alarm level for NSI 3000 Low Level CO Monitor-5 minutes2000ppmEPA standard for new vehicle emissions
25ppmMaximum allowable in a Parking Garage (International Mechanical Code)3000ppm+Typical emissions from propane lift trucks, gasoline powered tools etc. Death in less than
27ppm21% increase in cardio respiratory complaints (Kurt-1978)PPM = parts per million. A measure of pollutant concentration. Part
30ppmEarliest onset of exercise induced angina (World Health Organization) 1st visual display on UL2034 approved CO Alarm-Must not alarm before 30 days
35ppmUS NIOSH recommended 8 hour maximum workplace exposure EPA standard for outdoors for 1 hour and a maximum of 1 time per year Level many fire departments wear breathing apparatus before entering 2nd ambient level occupants should be notified and space ventilated 2nd Alarm level for NSI 3000 Low Level Monitor-5 minutes
 

Why Should I Demand a CO Test?

Carbon Monoxide is the #1 cause of poisonings in the U.S. Yet less than 5% of all CO Poisonings are reported! The safe and efficient operation of your heating equipment and other combustion appliances cannot be determined without testing using a calibrated combustion analyzer. Because the technology, instruments and training to do this testing correctly has only been available for a few years, odds are it’s never been done. Your service technician should be certified to properly test and diagnose potential CO exposure.
Why Should I Demand a CO Test?
It’s About Your Health, Safety and Comfort Carbon monoxide, even in small quantities can cause serious health problems, particularly in children and the elderly. Millions of unsuspecting homeowners are exposed to low levels of CO and don’t even know it. Unfortunately U.L. Listed CO alarms don’t go off until your family has been exposed to 70 ppm (parts per million) for over 3-1/2 hours! Most international limits for unsafe levels, including OSHA and the World Health Organization’s guidelines are between at 15-35 ppm. Carbon monoxide can come from additional sources in your home besides your heating equipment, and they should be checked. These sources include your Water Heater, Gas Range, Gas Logs, Space Heater, Boiler – even an attached garage.
Even New Equipment Needs to be Tested 
Anytime equipment is installed, it’s being exposed to conditions in which it has never been tested to perform. Venting systems, combustion air, duct systems, additional appliances in the building, building pressure etc., can all affect its operation. Besides that, after leaving the factory it’s likely your equipment has been loaded and unloaded on trucks and transported several times. Vibration and shock can cause components to shift and move. The only way to truly know if your new equipment is operating safely and efficiently is to test it once it’s been installed. Better Contractors Don’t Guess - They Measure If CO testing is part of your Contractor’s normal protocols he will advise you of this prior to servicing or installing equipment. Odds are when the tech walks into you house he’ll be carrying some type of CO Monitor to immediately check if unsafe CO levels are present. When working on the equipment, he will likely drill a hole in the flue of the appliance, and insert the probe of an electronic combustion analyzer to check actual burner performance. Additional performance testing might require holes to be drilled into the ductwork as well. Once he’s finished testing he should provide documentation and review his results with you.

Frequently Asked Questions

QUESTION: I have a CO alarm in my house, shouldn’t this warn me if there is a problem?
ANSWER: If you purchased your alarm from a store, it will usually only warn you of a life threatening condition. If you read the fine print on the product’s UL listing, you’ll find it offers little protection for children, the elderly, or persons with existing illnesses or CO sensitivity.
QUESTION: What level of carbon monoxide can be harmful?
ANSWER: According to the World Health Organization, 15-20 ppm is the first level of CO that can affect us. Levels as low as 30 ppm have been discovered to cause heart problems. Store CO alarms do not have to activate until they see 70 ppm for 3-1/2 hours!
QUESTION: What type of alarm should I have then?
ANSWER: Ask your contractor for a low-level monitor that alerts you at levels beginning at 15 ppm. Make sure it’s battery operated and visually tells you it’s working 24/7.
QUESTION: Can’t I just call my gas company if I think I have a problem?
ANSWER: Would you call the gas station if you had a problem with your car? Gas companies are well versed in fuel leaks, but their main business is not appliance service and few of them are Certified CO/Combustion Analysts.
QUESTION: How do I know if my contractor is a Certified CO/Combustion Analyst?
ANSWER: You can ask to see his NCI wallet card, plus you will recognize his level of expertise and ability to explain to you what he is doing.
What Should I Expect from my Heating Contractor?
As a consumer you should expect your contractor to be trained in current technology that makes sure you’re heating system is safe, comfortable and efficient. These are probably things you may expect are mandatory, but unfortunately they’re not. The number one benefit of having an NCI Certified CO/Combustion Analyst test your home and appliances for carbon monoxide is his extensive training and knowledge. Your contractor should be trained to measure the safety and efficiency of all your combustion equipment, even appliances that he doesn’t normally sell or service. Thorough testing can also verify that your equipment is operating at peak efficiency and provide the lowest operating costs. Finally, he should provide you with documentation that explains what he has found and what corrections have been or need to be performed. He should also provide you with material to better educate you about carbon monoxide sources and health effects.

Introducing The NSI 3000 Low-Level CO Monitor
Provides protection for all age groups and conditions, especially infants, children, the elderly, and highly sensitive or ill people. Other detectors barely provide minimal protection for healthy adults. Click Here for More Information on the NSI 3000 Low-Level CO Monitor.

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